Wednesday, May 12, 2010

Witches Chant; by William Shakespeare




Witches Chant; From the Tragedy of Macbeth.
Round about the cauldron go:
In the poisones entrails throw.
Toad,that under cold stone
Days and nights has thirty-one
Sweated venom sleeping got,
Boil thou first in the charmed pot.
Double,double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble

Fillet of a fenny snake,
In the cauldron boil and bake;
Eye of newt and toe of frog,
Wool of bat and tongue of dog,
Adder's fork and blindworm's sting,
Lizard's leg and howlet's wing.
For charm of powerful trouble,
Like a hell-broth boil and bubble.
Double,double toil and trouble;
Fire burn and cauldron bubble.

Scale of dragon,tooth of wolf,
Witch's mummy, maw and gulf
Of the ravin'd salt-sea shark,
Root of hemlock digg'd in the dark,
Liver of blaspheming Jew;
Gall of goat; andslips of yew
silver'd in the moon's eclipse;
Nose of Turk, and Tartar's lips;
Finger of birth-strangled babe
Ditch-deliver'd by the drab,-
Make the gruel thick and slab:
Add thereto a tiger's chaudron,
For ingredients of our cauldron.
Double,double toil and trouble,
Fire burn and cauldron bubble.

This was "the stuff" that would give me goosebumps! Can it get worse than this?


The Tragedy of Macbeth (commonly called Macbeth) is a play by William Shakespeare about a regicide and its aftermath.
It is Shakespeare's shortest tragedy and is believed to have been written sometime between 1603 and 1607. The earliest account of a performance of what was likely Shakespeare's play is April 1611, when Simon Forman recorded seeing such a play at the Globe Theatre. It was first published in the Folio of 1623, possibly from a prompt book for a specific performance.

Shakespeare's sources for the tragedy are the accounts of King Macbeth of Scotland. However, the story of Macbeth as told by Shakespeare bears no relation to real events in Scottish history as Macbeth was an admired and able monarch.
In the back-stage world of theatre, some believe that the play is cursed, and will not mention its name aloud, referring to it instead as "The Scottish Play". Over the centuries, the play has attracted some of the greatest actors in the roles of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth. The play has been adapted to film, television, opera, novels, and other media.


2 comments:

Stephanie said...

The podium seems tall. I hope the toads would not fall. And the way you took the pic in the shade is to follow the mood of the story? Sorry I have not read Shakespeare story before. But it sounds scary though... scale of dragon, tooth of wolf, witch's mummy! gosh!!

Titania said...

Hi Stephanie, thank you for your interest. Yes I think the picture suits this mood. Shakespeare is great philosopher. I think Goethe was his follower in an other century. I like them both. I read Goethe in German, he did not think differently then we think today. Great"stuff" my grandchildren would say!